Pommern heading north from the Great Australian Bight into Spencer Gulf.

The last remaining sailing ships in the world knew these waters well, as each season, after sailing from the Baltic, they would head north from the Great Australian Bight into Spencer Gulf. Their livelihood consisted of uplifting the grain that was grown over thousands of acres of farmland that surrounded the Gulf and transporting it to Europe. The Roaring ‘Forties –  powerful winds that encircle the globe at this latitude, would have brought Pommern from the South Atlantic, well south of the Cape of Good Hope, in good time, until longitude 134° was reached.  She would then head north for the Gulf.

It was usual to call at Port Lincoln where the grain ships would either load or receive orders to proceed to another Spencer Gulf port. Pommern’s last voyage  from Spencer Gulf was from Port Victoria and commenced on 20 March 1939. She arrived at Falmouth on 15 July and was ordered to Hull, where she discharged her cargo and loaded sand ballast dredged from the Humber River. She then sailed on to her home port of Mariehamn. Pommern  was laid up during the war and never went to sea again.

Now a museum ship

She is still afloat in Mariehamn, moored beside the Aland Maritime Museum. When it was realised that Pommern would never sail again, the Erikson family presented her to the town. Unlike other ‘museum ships’ around the world, Pommern is unique in that she is still kept in original condition. Apart from floodlighting and fire protection, there have been no additions, to mar her authenticity. The ballast that holds her upright is that which she loaded in Hull as it was considered it too was an important factor in retaining as much originality from the time when she was a working sailing ship.

Whilst she spends most of her life tethered to the quayside in Mariehamn, Pommern is taken periodically to the dry dock in Stockholm for regular inspections and maintenance. Whilst she is towed over, a few sails are always set for the sake of nostalgia.

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size:  20 x 28 cm  /  7.9 x 11 (in)

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.

Pommern heading north from the Great Australian Bight into Spencer Gulf.

The last remaining sailing ships in the world knew these waters well, as each season, after sailing from the Baltic, they would head north from the Great Australian Bight into Spencer Gulf. Their livelihood consisted of uplifting the grain that was grown over thousands of acres of farmland that surrounded the Gulf and transporting it to Europe. The Roaring ‘Forties –  powerful winds that encircle the globe at this latitude, would have brought Pommern from the South Atlantic, well south of the Cape of Good Hope, in good time, until longitude 134° was reached.  She would then head north for the Gulf.

It was usual to call at Port Lincoln where the grain ships would either load or receive orders to proceed to another Spencer Gulf port. Pommern’s last voyage  from Spencer Gulf was from Port Victoria and commenced on 20 March 1939. She arrived at Falmouth on 15 July and was ordered to Hull, where she discharged her cargo and loaded sand ballast dredged from the Humber River. She then sailed on to her home port of Mariehamn. Pommern  was laid up during the war and never went to sea again.

Now a museum ship

She is still afloat in Mariehamn, moored beside the Aland Maritime Museum. When it was realised that Pommern would never sail again, the Erikson family presented her to the town. Unlike other ‘museum ships’ around the world, Pommern is unique in that she is still kept in original condition. Apart from floodlighting and fire protection, there have been no additions, to mar her authenticity. The ballast that holds her upright is that which she loaded in Hull as it was considered it too was an important factor in retaining as much originality from the time when she was a working sailing ship.

Whilst she spends most of her life tethered to the quayside in Mariehamn, Pommern is taken periodically to the dry dock in Stockholm for regular inspections and maintenance. Whilst she is towed over, a few sails are always set for the sake of nostalgia.

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size:  20 x 28 cm  /  7.9 x 11 (in)

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.

The last remaining sailing ships in the world knew these waters well, as each season, after sailing from the Baltic, they would head north from the Great Australian Bight into Spencer Gulf.

Read more

Their livelihood consisted of uplifting the grain that was grown over thousands of acres of farmland that surrounded the Gulf and transporting it to Europe. The Roaring Forties – powerful winds that encircle the globe at this latitude, would have brought Pommern from the South Atlantic, well south of the Cape of Good Hope, in good time, until longitude 134° was reached. She would then head north for the Gulf.

It was usual to call at Port Lincoln where the grain ships would either load or receive orders to proceed to another Spencer Gulf port. Pommern’s last voyage  from Spencer Gulf was from Port Victoria and commenced on 20 March 1939. She arrived at Falmouth on 15 July and was ordered to Hull, where she discharged her cargo and loaded sand ballast dredged from the Humber River. She then sailed on to her home port of Mariehamn. Pommern was laid up during the war and never went to sea again.

Now a museum ship

She is still afloat in Mariehamn, moored beside the Aland Maritime Museum. When it was realised that Pommern would never sail again, the Erikson family presented her to the town. Unlike other ‘museum ships’ around the world, Pommern is unique in that she is still kept in original condition. Apart from floodlighting and fire protection, there have been no additions to mar her authenticity. The ballast that holds her upright is that which she loaded in Hull as it was considered it too was an important factor in retaining as much originality from the time when she was a working sailing ship.

Whilst she spends most of her life tethered to the quayside in Mariehamn, Pommern is taken periodically to the dry dock in Stockholm for regular inspections and maintenance. As she is towed over, a few sails are always set for the sake of nostalgia.

PRINT DETAILS

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size:  20 x 28 cm  /  7.9 x 11 (in)

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.