Polly Woodside was typical of the thousands of barques that emerged in the post clipper period, when iron and later steel, replaced wood, at least in British shipyards.

She was built in Belfast in 1885 for the shipowner W.J.Woodside who named  her after his wife. She entered the trade with Chile, taking out coal and returning with nitrates. In 1904 she was sold to A.H.Turnbull of Dunedin, New Zealand and renamed Rona. She became part of what was colloquially known as the inter-colonial fleet, taking timber to Australia and returning with coal, loaded at Newcastle NSW. She made her last voyage under sail in 1922, when she was rigged down for use as a coal hulk in Melbourne.

In the early years of World War 2, Rona was requisitioned by the Navy and towed to Milne Bay, New Guinea. This was a vital role, as she and many other hulks became floating warehouses for the build up of war materials for the Pacific campaign. They were moved from place to place using quickly attachable self-propelled barges known as ‘donkeys’.

Captain Doug Strath, an ex sailing ship mariner (4 masted barque Elginshire) told me how he was involved in her return to Melbourne at the end of the war. He was in command of a Navy tug, HMAS Sprightly, and together with Rona he brought back two Fairmiles, (air/sea rescue vessels) Air Bird and Air Chief, in a fan-wise tow. Rona’s hull was filled with spent Japanese shell cases retrieved from the battle areas. Back in Melbourne Rona returned to her old job of bunkering steamers.

Museum ship

In 1968 her owners, Howard Smith Industries sold her to the National Trust for one dollar. Given back her original name, her restoration commenced and whilst her rigging, decks and fittings are new, her hull has only had cosmetic work done on it. She is in a dry-dock but it is a pleasant nostalgic sight to look down the Yarra River where once dozens of square rigged ships berthed and see Polly Woodside’s masts and yards rising up proudly amid the buildings of the Melbourne cityscape.

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall: 29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size: 19.5 x 30 (cm)  /  5.5 x 11.8 (in)

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.

Polly Woodside was typical of the thousands of barques that emerged in the post clipper period, when iron and later steel, replaced wood, at least in British shipyards.

She was built in Belfast in 1885 for the shipowner W.J.Woodside who named  her after his wife. She entered the trade with Chile, taking out coal and returning with nitrates. In 1904 she was sold to A.H.Turnbull of Dunedin, New Zealand and renamed Rona. She became part of what was colloquially known as the inter-colonial fleet, taking timber to Australia and returning with coal, loaded at Newcastle NSW. She made her last voyage under sail in 1922, when she was rigged down for use as a coal hulk in Melbourne.

In the early years of World War 2, Rona was requisitioned by the Navy and towed to Milne Bay, New Guinea. This was a vital role, as she and many other hulks became floating warehouses for the build up of war materials for the Pacific campaign. They were moved from place to place using quickly attachable self-propelled barges known as ‘donkeys’.

Captain Doug Strath, an ex sailing ship mariner (4 masted barque Elginshire) told me how he was involved in her return to Melbourne at the end of the war. He was in command of a Navy tug, HMAS Sprightly, and together with Rona he brought back two Fairmiles, (air/sea rescue vessels) Air Bird and Air Chief, in a fan-wise tow. Rona’s hull was filled with spent Japanese shell cases retrieved from the battle areas. Back in Melbourne Rona returned to her old job of bunkering steamers.

Museum ship

In 1968 her owners, Howard Smith Industries sold her to the National Trust for one dollar. Given back her original name, her restoration commenced and whilst her rigging, decks and fittings are new, her hull has only had cosmetic work done on it. She is in a dry-dock but it is a pleasant nostalgic sight to look down the Yarra River where once dozens of square rigged ships berthed and see Polly Woodside’s masts and yards rising up proudly amid the buildings of the Melbourne cityscape.

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size: 19.5 x 30 (cm)  /  5.5 x 11.8 (in)

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.

Polly Woodside on the Tasman Run

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Polly Woodside was typical of the thousands of barques that emerged in the post clipper period, when iron and later steel, replaced wood, at least in British shipyards.

She was built in Belfast in 1885 for the shipowner W.J.Woodside who named  her after his wife. She entered the trade with Chile, taking out coal and returning with nitrates. In 1904 she was sold to A.H.Turnbull of Dunedin, New Zealand and renamed Rona. She became part of what was colloquially known as the inter-colonial fleet, taking timber to Australia and returning with coal, loaded at Newcastle NSW. She made her last voyage under sail in 1922, when she was rigged down for use as a coal hulk in Melbourne.

In the early years of World War 2, Rona was requisitioned by the Navy and towed to Milne Bay, New Guinea. This was a vital role, as she and many other hulks became floating warehouses for the build up of war materials for the Pacific campaign. They were moved from place to place using quickly attachable self-propelled barges known as ‘donkeys’.

Captain Doug Strath, an ex sailing ship mariner (4 masted barque Elginshire) told me how he was involved in her return to Melbourne at the end of the war. He was in command of a Navy tug, HMAS Sprightly, and together with Rona he brought back two Fairmiles, (air/sea rescue vessels) Air Bird and Air Chief, in a fan-wise tow. Rona’s hull was filled with spent Japanese shell cases retrieved from the battle areas. Back in Melbourne Rona returned to her old job of bunkering steamers.

Museum ship

In 1968 her owners, Howard Smith Industries sold her to the National Trust for one dollar. Given back her original name, her restoration commenced and whilst her rigging, decks and fittings are new, her hull has only had cosmetic work done on it. She is in a dry-dock but it is a pleasant nostalgic sight to look down the Yarra River where once dozens of square rigged ships berthed and see Polly Woodside’s masts and yards rising up proudly amid the buildings of the Melbourne cityscape.

PRINT DETAILS

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size: 19.5 x 30 (cm)  /  5.5 x 11.8 (in)

$54 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Shipping:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping & delivery information

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.