The four-masted barquentine Mozart drifts along in a calm, at the mouth of the English Channel, with a fog just lifting and a tug ranging up to see if she would like a tow.

Mozart and her seldom written about sister, Beethoven, were built in 1904 at Port Glasgow by Grangemouth Dockyard Co for A.C. de Freitas of Hamburg. Hugo Lundqvist, of Mariehamn, bought her in 1922 and until she was broken up in 1935 she sailed mainly in the Australian grain trade.

The term ‘soundings’ refers to the comparatively shallow water over the continental shelf surrounding a continental land mass. It was possible for a ship-master  to navigate through a fog by taking soundings, ie measuring the depth of the water with a lead line and comparing it with the depth at that position shown on the chart. The ‘lead’ was a bottle-shaped lead weight hollowed out at the base. Wax was placed in this hollow and when it struck the bottom, samples of the ocean floor adhered to it. This could be sand, mud, gravel or shells. The charts also gave an indication of the nature of the bottom at various points and this also gave an approximate location.

Mozart was the only barquentine in the Australian grain fleet. Barquentines were generally favoured for short hauls and coastal trading as they were easier to tack and required a smaller crew. George Kahre, author of ‘The Last Tall Ships’ (his brother Karl, one-time Director of Mariehamn Maritime Museum sailed in Mozart) stated that for her size, Mozart should have had five masts. This would have made her tall gaff-rigged sails narrower and more manageable. The heavy gaffs and their sails caused much wear on the rigging and running before the wind she was hard to steer. The run through the Roaring Forties would have been especially difficult as the wind direction varied frequently from south-west to north-west. A square rigger would just have to adjust her yards as the wind changed but with Mozart’s gaff rigged sails, a change of course would be necessary to avoid a gybe.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print on Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.

Print care

Although the inks used for these giclée prints is guaranteed to last 90 years under normal circumstances, their life will be reduced if hung in direct sunlight or strong ultraviolet light. They are intended to be framed under UV inhibiting glass, using acid free mounting materials. Non-reflecting glass is also recommended.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 cm / 11.7 x 16.5 in
Image size:  20.5 x 27.1 (cm)  /  8.1 x 10.7 (in)

$75 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

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The four-masted barquentine Mozart drifts along in a calm, at the mouth of the English Channel, with a fog just lifting and a tug ranging up to see if she would like a tow.

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Mozart and her seldom written about sister, Beethoven, were built in 1904 at Port Glasgow by Grangemouth Dockyard Co for A.C. de Freitas of Hamburg. Hugo Lundqvist, of Mariehamn, bought her in 1922 and until she was broken up in 1935 she sailed mainly in the Australian grain trade.

The term ‘soundings’ refers to the comparatively shallow water over the continental shelf surrounding a continental land mass. It was possible for a ship-master  to navigate through a fog by taking soundings, ie measuring the depth of the water with a lead line and comparing it with the depth at that position shown on the chart. The ‘lead’ was a bottle-shaped lead weight hollowed out at the base. Wax was placed in this hollow and when it struck the bottom, samples of the ocean floor adhered to it. This could be sand, mud, gravel or shells. The charts also gave an indication of the nature of the bottom at various points and this also gave an approximate location.

Mozart was the only barquentine in the Australian grain fleet. Barquentines were generally favoured for short hauls and coastal trading as they were easier to tack and required a smaller crew. George Kahre, author of ‘The Last Tall Ships’ (his brother Karl, one-time Director of Mariehamn Maritime Museum sailed in Mozart) stated that for her size, Mozart should have had five masts. This would have made her tall gaff-rigged sails narrower and more manageable. The heavy gaffs and their sails caused much wear on the rigging and running before the wind she was hard to steer. The run through the Roaring Forties would have been especially difficult as the wind direction varied frequently from south-west to north-west. A square rigger would just have to adjust her yards as the wind changed but with Mozart’s gaff rigged sails, a change of course would be necessary to avoid a gybe.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Print care

Although the inks used for these giclée prints is guaranteed to last 90 years under normal circumstances, their life will be reduced if hung in direct sunlight or strong ultraviolet light. They are intended to be framed under UV inhibiting glass, using acid free mounting materials. Non-reflecting glass is also recommended.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 cm / 11.7 x 16.5 in
Image size:  20.5 x 27.1 (cm)  /  8.1 x 10.7 (in)

$75 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping and delivery time

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.