The 4-masted barque L’Avenir is being pushed along by a moderate north-west wind in the Southern Ocean, on her way towards Cape Horn. She was built by Rickmers AG to the order of the Belgian Maritime Association, as a cargo-carrying training ship. Her name can be interpreted as ‘the future, or what is to come’, representing the expectations of her owners, that she would produce a continuing supply of sail-trained seamen. Finnish shipowner, Gustaf Erikson, a Finnish shipowner, bought her in 1932 and put her into  the grain trade with Australia. He retained her all white colour scheme which earned her the title, ‘Erikson’s yacht’. He utilised the extra accommodation that housed her cadets under her long poop, for passengers on the Australia run and for summer cruises around the Baltic. The pianist and composer, Percy Grainger made a voyage in her from Spencer Gulf to Falmouth in 1934.

In 1937 Erikson sold L’Avenir to Deutsches Schuleschiffs Verein, a maritime training institution sponsored by Hapag Lloyd, who continued to run her in the grain trade out to Spencer Gulf. They renamed her Admiral Karpfanger

On 8 February 1938 she sailed from Port Germein with full cargo of bagged grain. Her last radio report on 12 April placed her well on the way to Cape Horn. Nothing was heard of her after this. The most likely reason was that she broached-to with a heavy following sea; an encounter with an iceberg was also possible. The only wreckage found was a lifeboat and a door, washed up on the Chilean island of Navarino near Cape Horn.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print on Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.

Print care

Although the inks used for these giclée prints is guaranteed to last 90 years under normal circumstances, their life will be reduced if hung in direct sunlight or strong ultraviolet light. They are intended to be framed under UV inhibiting glass, using acid free mounting materials. Non-reflecting glass is also recommended.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size: 20.5 x 31.4 (cm)  /  8.1 x 12.4 (in)

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping and delivery time

$75 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.

The 4-masted barque L’Avenir is being pushed along by a moderate north-west wind in the Southern Ocean, on her way towards Cape Horn.

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She was built by Rickmers AG to the order of the Belgian Maritime Association, as a cargo-carrying training ship. Her name can be interpreted as ‘the future, or what is to come’, representing the expectations of her owners, that she would produce a continuing supply of sail-trained seamen. Finnish shipowner, Gustaf Erikson, a Finnish shipowner, bought her in 1932 and put her into  the grain trade with Australia. He retained her all white colour scheme which earned her the title, ‘Erikson’s yacht’. He utilised the extra accommodation that housed her cadets under her long poop, for passengers on the Australia run and for summer cruises around the Baltic. The pianist and composer, Percy Grainger made a voyage in her from Spencer Gulf to Falmouth in 1934.

In 1937 Erikson sold L’Avenir to Deutsches Schuleschiffs Verein, a maritime training institution sponsored by Hapag Lloyd, who continued to run her in the grain trade out to Spencer Gulf. They renamed her Admiral Karpfanger

On 8 February 1938 she sailed from Port Germein with full cargo of bagged grain. Her last radio report on 12 April placed her well on the way to Cape Horn. Nothing was heard of her after this. The most likely reason was that she broached-to with a heavy following sea; an encounter with an iceberg was also possible. The only wreckage found was a lifeboat and a door, washed up on the Chilean island of Navarino near Cape Horn.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Print care

Although the inks used for these giclée prints is guaranteed to last 90 years under normal circumstances, their life will be reduced if hung in direct sunlight or strong ultraviolet light. They are intended to be framed under UV inhibiting glass, using acid free mounting materials. Non-reflecting glass is also recommended.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size: 20.5 x 31.4 (cm)  /  8.1 x 12.4 (in)

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping and delivery time

$75 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.