This painting is about the closest that any of my paintings would come to being a ‘ship portrait’. As stated elsewhere, I prefer my paintings to tell a story or to illustrate a happening. City of Adelaide was of an earlier period than the ships whose crew members I have been able to question about their voyages.

She did not come under my scrutiny until a group in South Australia decided to ship her to Adelaide and to restore her. An enormously ambitious undertaking made seemingly impossible by the fact that she was in Scotland and up on the ‘hard’.  Her significance lies in her main activity during her early life of bringing immigrants to South Australia. However she has now been brought to Adelaide on a heavy lift ship.

I painted this portrait as a way of contributing to the enormous amount of money that would be required. I could not show her doing anything other than supposedly sailing past my easel in a pose that brings out the beauty of a ship with sails and revealing many of the features common to ships of her era.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print on Chromajet Spectrum 225 gsm satin paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size:  20.5  x  29.4 (cm)  /  8.1 x 11.6 (in)

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

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$75 AUD (includes shipping)

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She carries a full cargo of Australian wool. In the language of the sea, a sailing ship was always described as sailing ‘towards’ her next port rather than ‘to’. No doubt the term was coined to better describe the sailer’s track across the ocean, which, due to prevailing winds caused her to sail many miles away from her ‘rhumb’ line. This vessel was built as a cargo carrying training ship in 1921, for the Vinnen Company of Bremen. Otto Neumann her second mate told me that as she only carried fuel for 18 days she used her auxiliary engine for leaving or entering port or to get through the equatorial belt of calms known as the Doldrums.

In 1938 the Nord Deutscher Lloyd Line bought her and renamed her Kommodore Johnson. She sailed only within the Baltic during the War.  In 1945 Russia claimed her as a war prize and renamed her Sedov. She continued in her new role as a pure training ship for the Department of Fisheries and ceased to carry cargo. Her ‘tween decks were converted to accommodation for the large contingent of cadets she would now carry and a row of portholes now pierces her sides. She is still afloat and to subsidise her running costs takes paying passengers. The pilot vessel in the background is the Captain Cook a familiar sight on Sydney Harbour and the small launch in the foreground is typical of a fleet of work-boats operated by Stannard Bros. Well known to those who frequented the waters of this great Port, they were used for a variety of tasks. In this case it is likely that a newspaper photographer has hired the boat – as a sailing ship leaving Sydney in 1933 was a rare sight indeed.

PRINT DETAILS – Regular size print

Fine quality giclée print using lightfast ink on Canson ‘Aquarelle Rag’ 240 gsm art paper.

Overall:  29.7 x 42 (cm)  /  11.7 x 16.5 (in)
Image size:  20.5  x  29.4 (cm)  /  8.1 x 11.6 (in)

Shipping locations:  We ship to Australia, New Zealand, Europe and the USA for orders via the shopping cart. For other destinations please contact us for a shipping quote.

Shipping and delivery time

$75 AUD (includes shipping)

ADD TO CART

Questions? Please don't hesitate to contact us.